Capturing History Challenge Week 10

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So we kick off the 10th instalment of the challenge with some really cool images for you this week. This will be the final CHC before this Saturdays SPOOKTACULAR edition, so you will need to get those spooky images in real quick to have them included. This week we have a truck load of stunning Castles to see and a few ancient sites to explore, so we kick off proceedings with a trip to darkest Peru to see the UNESCO World Heritage Site and a series of ancient geoglyphs located in the Nazca Desert. Then we take a long trek back to England to the the mythical birthplace of King Arthur at Tintagel Castle in Cornwall. Next its a short journey over to Kent to check out the ‘Key to England’, the 11th century Dover Castle. We then take a long journey east to India, to finaly see the Kashmere Gate of Dehli. Next up we go to my home away from home and sunny Spain to see the Castle of Santa Barbara. Then we come back to the Emerald Isle for our final two stops of the week. First up is a walk around the old military complex known as Charles Fort in the historic port and fishing town of Kinsale in County Cork, followed by the Neolithic Stone Circle known as The Piper Stones in County Wicklow.So before we continue, just a quick reminder about the Spooktacular Challenge for Samhain/Halloween, depending on your views and/or customs. Images should be submitted via email by no later than midnight GMT on the Thursday 29th Oct, so I can ensure the challenge is ready to be posted on the Saturday morning. My email address is as always edmooneyphotography@gmail.com. For more details please click HERE.

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1. Nazca lines, Nazca Desert, Peru. By Ali Isaac @AliIsaacStoryteller

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2. Tintagel Castle, Cornwall, England. By Callum Dickson @StudentInSnowdonia

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3. Dover Castle, Kent, England. By Phil Platt @WheresPhil

4. Kashmere Gate, Old Dehli, India. By Rajiv Chopra  @ RajivChopra

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5. Santa Barbara Castle, Alicante, Spain. By Darlene Foster @ DarleneFostersBlog

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6. Charles Fort, Kinsale, Cork, Ireland. By Autumn Wagner @AutumnChangesBlog

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7. The Piper Stones, Athgreney, Wicklow, Ireland. By Ed Mooney @ EdMooneyPhotography

These old stone circles which go back to pre history are personal favourites of mine. They still seem to hold on to a certain magical energy after thousands of years and I always feel at complete peace when I visit them. There are two other similar Neolithic circles nearby. One at Broadleas and the other at Castleruddery. You can see my original post on the Piper Stones HERE.

Well that’s it for another week. I really have to thank each and every contributor whom has made this challenge possible by submitting their images. If you would like to know more about the individual sites please click the link under the image and visit their site. Many have posted about their image and I am sure that they would love to hear from you and answer any questions you might have. If you would like to join in on this challenge, please read on…………

So here is how you too, can join in;

The plan is quite simple, each Wednesday I will be posting an image of a random site with a heritage connection. Any images sent in will be included in the challenge along with your name and a link to your site. Full credit is given to each participant. The joy of this challenge is that we can all participate and share our images whilst raising the awareness of our own particular History and Heritage. The image can be anything from an old Church or Castle, to a Battlefield or Neolithic tomb, the choices are endless. And you can capture the image on any device you choose to. It can be in colour, black and white or any variation. The important thing is that we share.

And so to make sure that the challenge runs smoothly here are a few notes on how to participate:

  • All images must have been taking by you, there is no time restriction on this and you retain the copyright for your images
  • Images should be submitted via email by no later than midnight GMT on the Sunday before so I can ensure the challenge is ready to be posted on the Wednesday morning. My email address is edmooneyphotography@gmail.com
  • You don’t have to even have to be a WordPress blogger. This challenge is open to everyone, please include your name and a link back to your blog, website or social media page.
  • Images should be kept at low resolution with the largest side at 1000 pixels or less, if you need help with this you can pm me.
  • Once the challenge is published I will delete all files and mails from that week .
  • Each contributor should write a small piece about their image on their blog, for readers to check out, or at least the history behind the shot by adding  to the comments of each challenge.

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Due to the fantastic response to the Spooktacular Challenge, I have decided to put myself under pressure and extend the deadline for submissions untill midnight on Thursday 29th. I have already started compiling the challenge and its looking great so far. If you are still interested in particiating, then get your entries in soon. You can find out all about the challenge HERE and email all entries to edmooneyphotography@gmail.com.

 

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About edmooneyphotography

Photographer, Blogger, Ruinhunter, with an unhealthy obsession for history, mythology and the arcane.
This entry was posted in Capturing History Challenge, Diary of a Ruinhunter, Photography and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

42 Responses to Capturing History Challenge Week 10

  1. Sue Vincent says:

    Sorry I missed this week’s deadline, Ed!

  2. beetleypete says:

    I have been fascinated by the Nazca lines since reading ‘Chariots Of The Gods’ in 1969. It must be wonderful to see them up close. And whenever I have visited Tintagel (it always rained…) I used to try to imagine what it looked like before most of it fell off of the cliff. Nice stuff from everyone.
    Best wishes, Pete.

  3. Some more great pics as ever Ed. Quite like that amazing red wall of the Kashmere Gate.
    Afraid to say however I won’t have anything for your spooktacular although I will enjoy reading it!

  4. Ali Isaac says:

    Another marvelous combination of ancient places, Ed! Loved them all, but particularly Tintagel. I was obsessed with Arthurian legend before moving to Ireland, and managed to visit many places associated with him, but never got down to Tintagel. Fortunately, its still there to look forward to! One day…

  5. Capturing history indeed! Lovely post and beautiful photos!

  6. Darlene says:

    Some fabulous pictures here Ed. Thanks for including mine.

  7. Lots of great images this week! 🙂

  8. Bri Ollre says:

    Amazing photos! Just makes me want to hop on a plane and go!

  9. wheresphil says:

    A fabulous collection everyone. I was particularly taken with the Nazca Lines as I have never heard of them before and they are stunning and intriguing – and now on my to do list !!
    Thanks all 🙂

  10. jazzfeathers says:

    This is one of my favourite collection so far… you know… me being a fantasy fan, I have a soft spot for castles. And I’m a long time Arthurian fan, so you really hit me with Tintagel. Looks absolutely stunning too.

    And what about the standing stone circle?
    All the photosa are fantastic, don’t get me wrong, but some of them a closer to me 🙂

    Can’t wait to see and read the Spooktacular challenge!

  11. jfwknifton says:

    I love the Piper Stones. I can never get over just how really old they are.

  12. Thanks for including me Ed :), I’m glad to see the pictures came out alright, I’ve got plenty more where that came from 🙂

  13. I’m going to stop reading these posts. They just make me so jealous. The amount of world I’ve never seen!

    • Ah dont, I feel the same way, but if we cant visit them in person at least we get to see them 🙂

      • I’m only half-serious, Ed. It’s more that I’m so amazed at the diversity of the planet, so many aspects of it I’d never imagined, than actually wanting to go and touch it. Some places are best left in peace. Crowds of tourists spoil everything beautiful.

        • I know 🙂 And agree completely, I tend to stay clear of the tourist sites. Take Newgrange for example. One of Irelands best known ancient sites. But its over run with tourists which spoils the experience. Most of the places I visit are unknown and out of the way.

          • I’d hate to go back to Newgrange now. When I visited it as a child/adolescent there were no queues to get in. It was quiet and mysterious and the group of a dozen or so visitors we went in with were perfectly silent and respectful. Like being in church. The memories of breathing in prehistoric air and the presence of ancient people all around me was incredibly strong. All it needs is for some insensitive brute to crack a joke, film his friends arsing about and the atmosphere’s ruined.

      • By which I don’t mean your photographers 🙂 But busloads of gawpers in remote jungles are just sort of out of their element to my mind.

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